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 Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)

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PostSubject: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Fri Aug 11, 2017 7:33 pm

Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many"

Season: 5 | Episode: 10 | Original Air Date: August 12, 2017

SERIES FINALE

With Helena forced to take shelter behind enemy lines, it’s a bloody last stand for survival as Sarah and Art struggle to protect her, and end the siege on the sestras once and for all.

Source: BBC America
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PostSubject: Re: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Fri Aug 11, 2017 7:35 pm

Promo pics for ep 5x10:

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PostSubject: Re: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Fri Aug 11, 2017 9:45 pm



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PostSubject: Re: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Sat Aug 12, 2017 2:04 pm


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rzJ5EjI0HCM

Damn ... there's actually some melancholy coming up ... Sad
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PostSubject: Re: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Sun Aug 13, 2017 9:29 am

Wow ... the curtain has fallen ...
The ending was well done (if only Mrs. S would have survived too!).
But I really, really will miss this show and it's fine characters.
Watching those last 15 minutes of the series I had a lot of melancholy kicking in ...
I definitely would watch more of the clone club ... sadly all the good things have to end too ...
And there was no happy ending for Rachel ... I kind of fealt sad for her ...
Orphan Black was a truely unique show and it will always be worth a recommendation and another watch.
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PostSubject: Re: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Sun Aug 13, 2017 9:31 am

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PostSubject: Re: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Sun Aug 13, 2017 12:06 pm

Ew.com wrote:

Orphan Black creators answer series finale burning questions

Dalton Ross@DaltonRoss
Posted on August 12, 2017 at 11:05pm EDT

SPOILER ALERT: Read on only if you have already watched the series finale of Orphan Black.
Life. And death. We got both on the series finale of Orphan Black. The clones dispatched with both fake P.T. Westmoreland and Dr. Virginia Coady, but brought two new lives into the world when Helena gave birth to twins Arthur and Donnie in an emotionally charged scene that flashed back and forth between the present of Helena giving birth (with Sarah coaching her) and the past of Sarah giving birth to Kira (with the deceased Mrs. S by her side).
But the show was not done. We then jumped into the future and saw the sestras freed from conspiracies: Helena as a mom, Alison on the receiving end of a Donnie strip tease, Rachel providing intel on 274 Leda clones (including a new one named Camilla) out there that still needed to be inoculated, Cosima working with Delphine to inoculate them, and Sarah battling with the loss of Mrs. S and how to be a good mother for Kira. Instead of a mystery wrapped inside an enigma wrapped inside a question mark, the show finished on a very personal note as the clones helped Sarah overcome her feeling of loss and doubt — the last shot of the series being of Mrs. S’ empty house as Sarah, Kira, and Felix left for a day of fun in the sun at the beach.
We spoke to creators Graeme Manson and John Fawcett to get their thoughts on the final chapter of the Orphan Black saga. They talked all about that emotional double birth scene, the different ways in which they almost killed Rachel off, and what happened on set after they yelled “cut!” for the final time. (Click through both pages to read the entire article, and also make sure to check out our finale Q&A with Tatiana Maslany. and head here for news on a possible Orphan Black movie.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: When did you guys come up with your plan for how you wanted to end Orphan Black?
GRAEME MANSON: John and I sort of had a general ending in mind for quite a while. Helena’s been running around pregnant two seasons, so we knew that the finale was going to be having the twins, and technically we talked about that scene and how much that would mean to boil it down to Sarah and Helena. John had really strong ideas about making it an extremely difficult and dramatic birth, but also a massive, massive assault for Sarah, which I think was one of the most effective parts of that birth scene. And we had this idea that it was going to be a two-parter. We had that idea and we kind of knew where the cliffhanger was going to be, and then we knew early this year that after the climax of those first two acts that we were going to jump a few months into the future and see where everyone was and see what the future looked like.
JOHN FAWCETT: That was always kind of the plan. When we arrived at the finale, it really felt important not only to have a dangerous dramatic birth, but to do it early in the episode and to finish the real plot mechanics early in the episode so that we could jump ahead in time and be with the characters three months in the future. That was something that I think we always kind of knew that we wanted. There may have been some plot things that we hadn’t quite figured out, but I think tonally we knew what kind of episode we wanted 10 to be — that it was going to be an emotional departure and a goodbye and we wanted the audience to have a chance to be with these characters and to feel like they were going to be okay. That was really important to us.
While we were developing episode 9, the only big shift that happened was originally Graeme and I had thought that when Helena was grabbed she was going to be taken back to the island. So it was going to be Sarah coming to the island and rescuing Helena on the island, and that was the big thing that changed at the last minute. We decided that doesn’t work for us, so we brought the bad guys to us rather than us go to the bad guys. Other than that, we had this plan in place for the last three years.
There have been a lot of birth scenes on TV before, but I honestly cannot remember a more emotional one than this. John, tell me about this scene you shot that goes back and forth between Helena giving birth with Sarah there coaching, and a flashback to Sarah giving birth to Kira with Mrs. S coaching her through it, because that was pretty extraordinary.
FAWCETT: It’s interesting because when we talked about this season in broad strokes, we knew that we were going to be using flashbacks. It was going to be Sarah at the forefront of the last two episodes, and especially important in the finale. I also said to Graeme when we killed Mrs. S at the end of episode 8, I said, “Oh, for the love of God, there is no possible way that I can make a finale for Orphan Black and not have Maria Doyle Kennedy in the episode.” She’s got to be on set. She’s got to be there for the finale. So we went, okay, well, let’s use her! Let’s have flashbacks with Sarah and Mrs. S and use that as strongly as we can to support Sarah’s journey here. So when it came to designing the birth sequence, Graeme had this beautiful idea to crosscut these two births, and so that’s sort of how it was born.
The technical aspects of doing it were a completely different thing, but I’m so glad that you found it as moving as I did. I mean, in the end, it’s an extraordinary bit of emotional Orphan Blackness. After I shot it, I was like, “Wow, I’ve never seen that on TV before.”
MANSON: Yeah, twins. It’s not just one birth, it’s two.
FAWCETT: And it’s a long sequence, so our hats off to Tatiana, to Maria Doyle Kennedy, and to Kathryn Alexandre, Tatiana’s acting double, for the amazing work that they did in that set.
MANSON: And don’t forget Kevin Hanchard! Don’t forget Art was there for support.
FAWCETT: It took a lot of work to do that birthing sequence. It’s such an emotional scene and they’ve got to be there every single time. When you’re doing these complicated shots, you never get it in one take, so you’ve got to be there emotionally so much. It’s incredibly draining on an actor, and then on top of that, we have live babies that we were like, “We’re going to have live babies in a clone shot!” It was very challenging. There is no question.
It’s interesting that the hurdle Sarah has to clear really has nothing to do with clones or conspiracies but rather her own insecurities as a mother.
MANSON: Yeah, that was the whole thing that we really wanted to do. We wanted to come back from this place and we wanted to ask ourselves: Okay, for each character, what does freedom look like to them? And so we sort of alighted them this idea that we would return to Helena’s baby shower, much the way that season 3 opened with the baby shower.
We loved that mirror, but also we wanted the last person over the hump to be Sarah — this girl who’s been through so much, who lost her mother, who has been everybody’s rock and has not been able to emotionally come to terms with everything that they’ve gone through. We really love the concern about her shown by all the other characters, and Tatiana did a marvelous job of portraying that real subtle quiet pain, that inability to move forward that Sarah has there. And, of course, it’s only her sisters that can help her move forward like she helped them all the way along. This reluctant hero has grown up and she’s filled her mother’s shoes.
Graeme brought up the whole baby shower party. John, how tricky was that four-clone scene at night on the patio to shoot?
FAWCETT: It was a long scene. I remember reading it in the script with Graeme and going, “Oh my God, these are the longest scenes we’ve ever done!” Because a lot of our scene work is not often very lengthy. So this is a long sequence, and it’s divided up here and there. We cut away to Felix in the car with Rachel, cut back in, but it’s a long bit with the sisters in the backyard. To be honest, technically once you’ve done clone dance parties and clone dinner tables and clone twin births, this was actually a fairly simple scene to shoot in the big scheme of things. It took a little while because there was obviously a lot of them in the scene.
I think the most difficult aspect of it was really trying, as a director, to be very, very focused on the performances and to be very focused on what each character was bringing, and be there for Tat in every moment and be present there with her in every single moment. The challenging part was just how emotional that scene was. I think that was the night that we wrapped the character of Cosima. That was her last scene, and so I remember it for that. I remember knowing that as soon as I called “cut” on set and we were done with the scene that I was never going to see Cosima again after that, and we had many days like that. You go to set with your heart on your sleeve a little bit and you just be there. You just be there and be in it and just try and be present. That’s what it was for me. That’s what I remember from it.
You did something really interesting with Rachel at the end here, where even though she redeems herself and gives them this vital info about the other clones out there, she is still excluded from that inner circle and told by Felix that she can’t come in. Did you play with different ideas in terms of how Rachel’s story would end?
MANSON: We did. John, myself, and the writers — we wanted Rachel to come around this year, but we didn’t want any of it to be easy, and we didn’t want to put too rosy a ribbon on it at the end. But we did have a lot of convincing to do to convince networks and producers that this was a good idea for the character of Rachel. A lot of people really thought that she was irredeemable. How could you redeem Rachel? But slowly chipping away it was a really big arc this year of revealing Rachel to herself first, and then how is Rachel going to react? And through episode 8 and 9 we played with the tension of not knowing where Rachel was going to land, but then when we do get to the end and Rachel has sided with her sisters, I think she knows that there is no way that Sarah would allow Rachel to walk into that house, and I think that they all know that.
FAWCETT: It seemed to me, Graeme, for a while there, you really wanted Rachel dead too.
MANSON: I don’t…
FAWCETT: No, you weren’t on the Rachel dead bandwagon?
MANSON: We didn’t know exactly how it would play out, but you, in particular, were very invested in the character of Rachel. [Killing her] was the easy narrative way out. We thought that there was a deeper story to tell there and we’re really proud of how we told it, particularly setting her up with that episode 7.
FAWCETT: We didn’t want to wrap a big bow on it but we wanted Rachel to come around at some point. We wanted her to do the right thing, and we wanted that all through the seasons. We’ve seen her do some things that are kind of good, but then go back to being bad. It’s really fun for her being bad, but I felt like if there was any way to redeem this girl that this was the season to do it in, and it would be great to see her and realize who she is and that she’s not better than everyone else. Rachel, she’s been one of my favorite characters through so many seasons, and this season, in particular, I think Rachel has an incredible story arc.
MANSON: You’re right though. I remember now, John. At the beginning of the season, I was lobbying to have Sarah lop off Rachel’s head with a samurai sword.
FAWCETT: You wanted Rachel to drive her wheelchair off the dock and into the lake as I recall.
MANSON: Yeah, we floated a few Rachel deaths, but I’m glad we did the hard work of ending her story this way.
You guys need to go back and make a supercut of all the Rachel death scenes that you didn’t do.
FAWCETT: One of the other things that I will note that is one of my favorite little subtle elements to those scenes with Felix and Rachel is we very subtly added some visual effects to Rachel’s eye, because her eye has been replaced. It’s obviously a glass eye now, and so we just ever so subtly kind of adjusted her one eye so that you could see that it was just a little off kilter, and that was the crown and glory on those Rachel sets, which I just love.
The very last shot of Orphan Black is of the empty house. Where did that idea come from?
MANSON: We found that late. It was easier for us to figure out where the other clones were when we see them doing whatever they want to do with their freedom, and then we were asking that question, “Well, what does freedom look like to Sarah?” And freedom to Sarah is accepting her role as a mother, it’s accepting the death of her mother, it’s accepting this family, and it’s the ability to stay in place. And then I remember it was John, your idea that it should be in the kitchen, it should be Mrs. S’ home. It should have that teapot in it, and it was just a nice little send-off.
FAWCETT: Because at the end of the show after everything that Sarah has come through, the last thing that they’re going to do is they’re going to go as a family down to the beach, and actually just go to the beach and enjoy the day. And it just felt so strange doing that. It didn’t really feel like Orphan Black at all when we shot that scene and ending in the wide shot in Mrs. S’ house. I think that’s a set that we’ve had so much in the series. It means everything. That place is Sarah, and it is Mrs. S, and it is Kira, and I like the idea that when they left for the beach, they ate breakfast really quick and left breakfast out on the table, and just left. I wanted that feeling that everything is right in the world, and that things are going to be okay.
So what was the last day on set like?
MANSON: The last day on set was the birth. Right, John?
FAWCETT: It sure was. The birthing sequence took two days. Sarah wrapped earlier that last day, and then right at the very end, we were left with Helena and Art, and so it was Helena that wrapped last. It was about four o’clock in the morning when we wrapped, and at about one or two o’clock in the morning people just started showing up on set. At one point I stepped out of the set and went back to the monitors, and there were tons of chairs set up, and all of the cast had arrived. All these people that I hadn’t seen in a long time, and all the current cast, and everyone was there.
MANSON: There must’ve been 80 people at the monitors.
FAWCETT: Yeah, for the last two hours.
MANSON: When we called “cut” there was just silence, nobody quite knew what to say. I think John said, “Let’s not say anything,” and we all just stood there for a while. And then slowly people started to pipe up, from crew to cast, to just express what the show has meant to them and the experience of all working together and completing this crazy story together, and then Maria Doyle Kennedy sang a beautiful song.
FAWCETT: And then we had bagels.
MANSON: And champagne.
FAWCETT: Yeah, it was quite something, because everyone was there and we just all gathered on set and it was just a big group hug basically. We just all huddled on the set and no one wanted to leave.
Anything you all want to add about this journey coming to an end?
MANSON: We just really want to think Clone Club. We want to say to our fans that you’ve been amazing. You held up our little show. You’re so creative. We hope you continue to remain a family, and create your own families, and we hope you make beautiful crazy science, and fun. I’m getting emotional just saying thank you, Clone Club. Thank you for being there for five seasons of this show.
FAWCETT: Absolutely. Clone Club — their excitement and passion really carried us in some darker periods of making this show because it wasn’t all flowers all the time. It was hard, and just seeing all the excitement and enthusiasm for what we were doing, it really boosted us and carried us through tough parts of not just making the show, but all the stuff that goes on behind the scenes, all the personal stuff. There are all sorts of things that happen over the course of five years, and it was such incredible support that we got, and so yes, thank you, Clone Club from the bottom of my heart.
Head here to read our finale Q&A with Tatiana Maslany.
Click here for news on a possible Orphan Black movie
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PostSubject: Re: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Sun Aug 13, 2017 12:44 pm

http://deadline.com wrote:

Orphan Black Co-Creator Talks Series Finale, Movie Reunion & #Clone Club

by Dominic Patten  August 12, 2017 8:02pm


BBC America

SPOILER ALERT: This story contains details of tonight’s Orphan Black series finale on BBC America. 

Related: 'Orphan Black' Final Season Review: Tatiana Maslany's Last Trip Worth Taking
“We’ve talked since the beginning of wanting to do some kind of feature or some kind of two-hour continuation of the series,” admits Orphan Black co-creator John Fawcett of how he and Graeme Manson could see more of the Tatiana Maslany starring show after tonight’s series finale.

After five seasons with Neolution revelations, siblings, deaths and births, the tale of the Maslany played clone Sarah and the sestras came to an end for now with the Fawcett-directed “To Right The Wrongs of Many.” However, after the vanquishing of the aged and manipulative P.T. Westmoreland (Stephen McHattie) as Sarah, twin Helena, Cosima and Alison sat together in the latter’s backyard in tears and love, the door was opened for more with another 274 Leda clones out there around the world – thanks to a list procured from fellow clone Rachel.
Months after filming those finale scenes with the Emmy-winning Maslany, Fawcett chatted with me about the grand plan for the show, working with the Golden Globe and SAG Awards nominee and the strong emotions on set at the end. As well as discussing the possibility of more Orphan Black, the Ginger Snaps helmer also had a ton of praise and appreciation for the Clone Club fans of the BBC America series – and what they meant to the Canadian-made Temple Street Productions show, past, present and future.

DEADLINE: I have to ask right at the top, is this the series finale that Graeme and yourself envisioned for Orphan Black from the beginning? 
FAWCETT: I think it is in a lot of ways. In some respects, I think that we imagined that the finale really was going to boil down to Sarah and Helena, and that we were going to have to deal with P.T. Westmoreland. We knew that, critically, we were going to have a really kind of dirty, awful, nasty birth, and that that was going to be part of kind of this two-part finale.
DEADLINE: Well, that does sound like “To Right The Wrongs of Many” in a nutshell…
FAWCETT: Yes, but I think we also understood that killing P.T. Westmoreland was important, but not the most important thing for us. It is something you had to do, but that, tonally, for the final episode, we wanted it to be a much more emotional episode. We wanted to structure it in a way that we were finished with plot fairly early on in the episode so that we could make this time jump, as we did. We were really interested in moving forward into the future three months to see where everyone is.
DEADLINE: Part of that jump, nearly at the very end, with the backyard party at Alison’s with the core sestras together around a still shattered Sarah, was Helena reading from her book called Orphan Black of her life and the other clones. Why did you choose that bookending, pardon the pun?
FAWCETT: That was something we devised at the beginning of Season 5, though we had talked about it before. We liked the idea that Helena has been jotting down her memoirs and really, like, exactly that, it comes down to the sisters. It comes down to the twin sisters, between Sarah and Helena.
It’s very important that we’ve ended this in a way that we believed it was nice to have some really strong belief that Helena, after everything that she’s come through, is now going to be a very capable mother. So that somehow, by having her read her journals and her memoirs and bringing us back to the beginning of the series, it just seemed like the right place to end her. You know, we laughed a lot about the idea that Helena would wind up somewhere getting a book deal and maybe going on a book tour at some point. Of course, that’s just what we’ve joked about.

DEADLINE: But the series finale is not really the end of Orphan Black is it? With Cosima and Delphine now traveling the world to find the other 274 Ledas, there is a lot of ripe story or a lot more stories to tell, isn’t there?
FAWCETT: It certainly is. I think that to Graham and I, the imagery and the ideas that come from the concept of Delphine and Cosima out in the world journeying to find these 274 Ledas is certainly ripe, there’s no question. We’ve talked since the beginning of wanting to do some kind of feature or some kind of two-hour continuation of the series.
At this point, I think we’re happy that it’s come to a conclusion that we feel satisfied with, and it closes this chapter. Graham and I are both going to let it sit for a little bit, but I know that these characters are so strong with us and so engrained with us, that there’s certainly a chance that we’ll pick that up and continue.
DEADLINE: And would Tatiana be a part of that were you to continue it?
FAWCETT: Well, that would be lovely. Like I say, I don’t see that in the near, near future, but something that we’ve certainly always talked about and talked about as a group amongst the cast. So it’s not something that we’re keeping to ourselves. It’s something that we aspire to do at some point.
DEADLINE: Duly noted for the future, but to jump back to the now of Orphan Black, you set the series ender up as a two-part finale. But I got to say, to me it felt like the penultimate episode “One Fettered Slave,” especially following the death of Sarah and Felix’s foster mother Siobhan the week before, was really the Season 5 finale and the last episode was a series finale, and they were two different constructions, was that intentional?
FAWCETT: Yeah, I think that’s a fair assumption. I mean that’s the way we sort of imagined it being. Obviously, we’ve spent five seasons dealing with a large, complicated plot, and we really wanted the time to explore these other issues. Explore the issues of sisters, and of motherhood, and of the matriarchy, and put the focus kind of squarely on Sarah, who has come through slaughter and who has been so strong for everyone up until this point Now she is feeling a bit broken. To everything that she’s worked for, now she has. She has her freedom, and she doesn’t know what to do with it and is having a hard time moving on.
DEADLINE: There’s that poignant line in the finale where Tatiana says, as Sarah to the other clones, there’s nobody left to fight, kind of sums up where’s she’s at, and it’s not a good place…
FAWCETT: I think of it almost like PTSD. She’s really stuck now in this trying to go back to a normal life after everything that she’s been through. I think Sarah is having an extremely difficult time with that, and it’s nice now because now she has this sisterhood to sort of lean on and this group that can help her. I also think it’s interesting that Sarah’s the one that suffers the most as we move forward into the future. So it rings very, very true to me, and you know, we didn’t want it to be heavy-handed, but it certainly follows this hero’s journey of Sarah’s.

DEADLINE: Along that journey, as well as the Sarah assisted birth of Helena’s twins in the finale, there were some serious losses. In the last few episodes, the Maria Doyle Kennedy portrayed Siobhan was killed, a big blow to Sarah, Westmorland obviously was finally taken down, Kyra Harper’s Dr. Virginia Coady too. I get the last two, as the villains of the series but why couldn’t Siobhan make it through to the end, be there for all the sestras and the newborn Purple and Orange?
FAWCETT: You know, in thinking of the finale, we had never necessarily thought that Siobhan wouldn’t be there, but at the beginning, as we were breaking Season 5, it seemed like the strongest thing to do for Sarah’s journey. Dramatically, it felt like the right thing to do. It was a big thing to do.
I’m trying to harken back to all the reasons why we did this, but it really boils down to Sarah’s journey, and the matriarchy. Sarah now knows her mother has heroically sacrificed herself, in a way, to bring about the end of Neolution and to free not just her daughter, but the sisters. It’s interesting to see Sarah now without her mother having to fill those shoes and pick up and continue and really be the mother. And I think that that’s what gives Sarah in the finale this conflict, and this dilemma, and this soul searching that she’s going through. And then be able to rise above, be the mother, be in the house, and be stronger because of it.
Related: Emmys: Tatiana Maslany Gets Her First Lead Actress In A Drama Series Win For ‘Orphan Black’

DEADLINE: Speaking of Sarah’s journey, of Helena’s journey, of Cosima’s journey, of Alison’s journey and even of Rachel’s journey, obviously Tatiana won the clearly deserved Best Dramatic Actress Emmy last year, but what has the evolution of her multi-role and multi-faceted journey as an actress on the show been like from your perspective?
FAWCETT: Well. I’ll say, she really became a very strong collaborator really early on. You know, we started to trust her very quickly, her instincts very quickly, and her ideas very quickly very early on. Just in the early get-go, she solves some big problems for us, which was around Helena, and what Helena wanted, and who she felt Helena was. Because, you know, in our very rudimentary beginnings, Helena was just an assassin, there was really not a lot of character development or even a ton of thought that we put into it.
We knew that Helena was Sarah’s twin and that, at the end of season 1, that Sarah was going to shoot her, and that she was going to be an antagonist, essentially. But it was really Tat that came to that from a very different direction and started to breathe this very different life into this character, which started to spin Helena in a direction that we didn’t necessarily foresee. The more she did that, the more we all sort of began to trust each other, the tighter we got, and the more collaborative it got, and to the point where we really relied on Tat.

In the early breaking of scripts, we would pitch episodes to her and bring her into the process very early on to just read her instincts, because she has very good sort of character instincts and often very good story ideas. So she has certainly grown very close to Graham and I, and she’s a dear friend and an incredibly talented person.
And those are the kinds of people that you want to surround yourself with, you know? We’re very fortunate that this family, and not just our relationship with Tat, but the family, the creative family that we surrounded ourselves was very tight, and very smart, and very passionate bunch of people.
DEADLINE: Which must have taken on added resonance as you came to the end this final season, those final filming days with you directing the last episode, as you had so many seasons before…
FAWCETT: You know, it’s very different when you know that this is the end, and certainly managing to just even maneuver all the emotions, not just mine, but certainly of the crew and specifically the cast every day on set, and move the ship forward constantly, that was challenging.
Every other day, we were wrapping a significant character, you know, whether it was a clone, one of Tat’s characters, or any of these actors that we’d been with for so long. And so every day seemed emotional, and it was tough. It was tough in one sense because, at the same time, you’re working on a schedule, and you’ve got a lot to shoot in a day. But I thought it was important that we had to just kind of stand still as a character wrapped, gather everyone around, and talk and talk about the journey, and let the actor say goodbye, and be there, and be present. Some of those scenes, a lot of those scenes, they were often very difficult.
DEADLINE: How do you mean?

FAWCETT: Well, the big clone scene in the backyard, honestly, technically was not that difficult considering what we’d done through the course of the series. What was difficult was making sure that I was there and very present for all the emotional aspects that needed to be captured, and be present myself, not be thinking about what I was going to be shooting next or anything like that. I wanted to be very, very aware of just standing there, and being there, and being a part of and guiding Tat, and being there for her emotionally. That’s what the end was, and it was hard to do. It was probably the hardest episode of Orphan Black that I’ve shot, but from an emotional place, not from a technical place.
DEADLINE: I assume on a series that has the explorations of many frayed and raw emotions of the most basic sense of who one actually is, there would be a lot of those hard moments, so to speak. What are the ones, if you don’t mind me asking, that now stand out for you with the series over?
FAWCETT: You know, going through five seasons, the things that I take away the most are these emotional moments, these last moments that I had with Tat, you know, crying with her as we sort of wrapped Alison and being with her as we wrapped Cosima, Sarah and Helena.
Our last moments on the set together, once we’d finally called cut on our final shot, I gathered everyone together in the set. I said, “let’s just hang out together and enjoy this moment and not leave.” We just kind of hung out quietly for a while, until Maria decided to sing a song. So, over all, to answer your question, I think it’s obviously the early-on excitement of what we were doing, and then the emotional closing I think were my big moments.

DEADLINE: That will be an emotional point too, I’m sure for fans of the show, who were such a big part of Orphan Black in their dedication and almost unprecedented involvement in the series over the years. What would you say to the Clone Club now that that Orphan Black, or at least this iteration of Orphan Black, is over?
FAWCETT: Well, first, I owe a great debt to the Clone Club, the fans. I’m constantly in awe of them. Who they are, and just the very talented, artistic, smart, creative, intellectual bunch of people that they are.
I just always like to thank Clone Club for all their support over the past five seasons, and they really carried us through some difficult times, and their enthusiasm. I mean, the show wouldn’t be the same without their undying love for the show. So thank you, Clone Club.
I also want to note that his group have found each other through five seasons, and a lot of friendships and relationships have formed via social media and through the show. I just hope that this family, this group of people, will stay together, you know? That’s sort of what I hope. I just hope that this group, all these relationships will now continue forward into the future and that they will continue to create, and rise above, and express themselves as the creative people that they are.
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PostSubject: Re: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Sun Aug 13, 2017 12:56 pm

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com wrote:

Orphan Black Star Tatiana Maslany Talks Finale, Possible Sequel and What's Next


August 12, 2017  8:04pm PT by  Amber Dowling  

Courtesy of Ken Woroner/BBC AMERICA
   
The actress reflects on the show’s happy ending, rollerblading to her audition and the future of Clone Club.

[Warning: This story contains spoilers from the series finale of BBC America’s Orphan Black, “To Right the Wrongs of Many.”]

After five seasons and an Emmy win for series star Tatiana Maslany, Orphan Black ended its run on Saturday with a neat and tidy finale that saw the sestras reunited in their newfound freedom.

While the first half of the episode focused on Helena’s birth and Sarah’s successful attempts to stop Neolution once and for all, the second half honed in on what that newfound freedom actually looked like for the characters and how they move on from here.

Speaking of moving on, THR caught up with Maslany following the show’s final episode. Here, she reflects on those early auditions for the drama in Toronto, the series' evolution over five seasons, and how she’ll select her future roles.

What is it about Orphan Black that has resonated with audiences?

It’s a show about outsiders and people relate and empathize with that and see themselves in that. I don’t think any of us really feel like we’re inside of that; at least I certainly don’t. A lot of our fan base is people who are looking to see themselves represented onscreen so that’s been a big part of it. We were also just lucky; we kind of hit at the right time. The gimmick of the show, the conceit of the show could have certainly fallen on its face but it worked thanks to all of the components. There was an amazing post-production with intelligent creatures making those clone scenes happen and actually making us believe there are two of me in one scene. Kathryn Alexandre — finding her as a clone double was enormous. I guess people are just willing to go on a journey that felt imaginative. It felt genre-bending, so people were excited by how different it was.


Read More: Orphan Black' Creators Break Down Series Finale Time Jump and Potential Movie


Years ago you rollerbladed to your audition for this. What do you remember about that time and process now?

I remember dreaming about Sarah heading into the audition and fantasizing about playing the part and all of these characters. I kept picturing that train platform scene, the first one where we see Sarah and fantasizing about it. Heading to that last audition, I rollerbladed so that I felt that I was in my body and not panicking in my head. I just wanted to feel grounded and ready to play. Doing those auditions was so much fun, getting to work with the Felixes and trying out all of those characters was such a workout. I didn’t really think too far past that. I just went into that room to play.

Countless people have quoted you as being the hardest-working person in Hollywood. Knowing what you know now, would you sign up for something like this again?

I don’t think any of us knew what it was going to be when it started. [Creators] John Fawcett and Graeme Manson certainly had huge ideas and details about what the season was going to look like but it kind of grew into its own thing as it evolved. Characters like Donnie opened things up. Kristian Bruun was supposed to be killed in like episode six of the first season or something. And because he was an incredible character and he’s this whole other side that the show needed in suburban drama, he survived and became one of the most important characters on the show. I don’t think any of us knew what it was going to be. I’m just up for whatever thing turns me on and makes me go, “Well, I can’t imagine how this is going to work” or, “This is such a huge risk” or whatever, because I couldn’t have predicted Orphan Black. I’m open to being surprised by whatever challenge comes and not writing anything off.

How quickly do you see that happening?

I’ve always worked since I was nine years old and I’ve been non-stop sometimes with two or three projects on top of each other. Work has always been a huge defining feature of life and who I am. What’s been nice about finishing Orphan Black is that it feels like I can take a little second to be and regroup and reenergize because a show like that took a lot of my life and emotions and everything. I definitely needed to sleep after that. I’m in a place of reading things and following what’s exciting to me and not panicking. I’ve always been a working actor and I’m happy to go back to auditioning or whatever. But I’m not going to jump in before I’m ready.

An actor playing twins or more than one character isn’t necessarily new, but new technology is making it more appealing these days; James Franco is playing twins in his new HBO show The Deuce, for example. Would you offer him – or anyone else playing dual roles – any kind of advice?

Oh my God no. Not at all. I watched Moon before we did Orphan Black, which is that awesome Sam Rockwell movie where he plays multiple characters. What I find interesting about him or someone like James Franco doing it is that they’re such improvisational actors — they come from such a free and loose place. So for them to do something so technical is really interesting to me. I think it is about trying to find the breath and the spontaneity within a very structured, technical thing. That’s the only advice I could possible give. And then find yourself a Kathryn Alexandre who is a genius and takes everything you’re doing on your side and then gives you back an incredible, moving performance that keeps you present and in the scene.


Read More: Tatiana Maslany: "Emmy Snubs Put 'Orphan' on the Map" (Q&A)


In terms of Orphan Black’s ending, did you always know the core four (or five if you include Rachel) would make it out alive?

There was always debate about who might go every season. I don’t know what ended up making John and Graeme keep them all until the end but I’m happy for it. I hated saying goodbye to any of them prematurely. I don’t think anyone was really safe until that last episode was written.

Was it specifically important to keep Cosima alive given the “bury your gays” trope that’s been so predominant on television the past couple of years in particular?

Yeah but I don’t think just for that reason. We just felt like she was supposed to survive. That’s who she was and that’s kind of who the clones were. Their strength and goodness as individuals was only stronger when they came together as sisters. Cosima’s been through a shitload of things in terms of her life, her illness and all of that. It wasn’t too much of waving the flag or anything, we just really wanted her to live on her own merit. Obviously we’re certainly aware of this epidemic of killing off these characters on shows and we didn’t want to fall into that, but it wasn’t solely that that kept Cosima alive.

Was it also just nice to have a happy ending? That’s something that isn’t quite so common on TV nowadays.

Yes, definitely. My favorite aspect of the finale was the point when Sarah finishes off Neolution and Helena gives birth to the babies and then we kind of go forward in time and see what it means to have that freedom. And how Sarah is kind of stuck and unable to move forward and unable to embrace this thing that she’s fought so hard for. It’s a very human thing to kind of dream about something and then when you’ve got it you don’t know what to do with it. I love that conflict taking us into a happier resolution.

The finale revealed there were 274 clones out there. Where do you stand on the inevitable movie or spinoff question? Would you consider it and if so, how much time in between would you ideally need?

If there was some story that we really wanted to tell that fit in the OB universe and it was vital and different and new then that would be super cool. But we finished this before it trailed on too long so hopefully it left people wanting more as opposed to being like, "Thank God that’s over."

Even though the show is done, Clone Club will inevitably live on… how will that factor into your life?

We’ve had such a good run with Clone Club and it’s been the whole reason people have watched the show, so I don’t know what that’s going to look like in the future. It’s all been so moving… This fan base has been so supportive and fans across the world have been supporting each other and taking care of each other… that’s just the coolest thing.

Thoughts? Sound off in the comments below.

Twitter: @amber_dowling
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PostSubject: Re: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Sun Aug 13, 2017 1:20 pm

www.hollywoodreporter.com wrote:

Orphan Black Creators Break Down Series Finale Time Jump and Potential Movie

August 12, 2017  8:04pm PT by  Amber Dowling  

Courtesy of Ken Woroner/BBC AMERICA
   
Graeme Manson and John Fawcett explain the extended ending and which clone they almost killed off.

[Warning: This story contains spoilers from Saturday's series finale of BBC America’s Orphan Black, “To Right the Wrongs of Many.”]

It’s taken five seasons, but Sarah (Tatiana Maslany) and her sisters finally finished off Neolution and the crazed scientists behind the clones’ creation on Saturday’s series finale of Orphan Black. In fact, the entire battle wrapped up with a birth, a death and the clones finding their ultimate freedom within the first 30 minutes of the episode.

That left plenty of time to explore the theme of freedom and what it actually meant to Sarah, Helena, Cosima and Alison as the show jumped forward three months in time to a happier place where the family could finally celebrate being together.

It was a happy ending not often seen these days on television, and one that creators John Fawcett and Graeme Manson always had in their heads when they first began developing this show more than a decade ago. THR caught up with the duo to get their take on wrapping up the cult-favorite show, inserting one final Easter egg for fans and how the Clone Club might live on in the future.

How did this finale change from the one you had in your heads when you started out?

Manson: We’ve been running around with a pregnant Helena for two or three seasons now so we knew the birth was going to be a huge element of the finale. But we did make this decision that there was going to be a three-month jump in time; the truth is that John and I had something similar in mind for quite a while when we were always thinking about our finale.

Fawcett: We really knew that what everything was going to boil down to was that we really wanted the climax of the story to revolve around Sarah and Helena, the two twin sisters and that there would be a dramatic, dangerous birth. In broad strokes, that was kind of always where we were driving. We also knew we wanted the finale to wind up the plot fairly early on so that we could spend a good chunk of the final show with the characters and make this jump in time and be with them in the future and see where their lives have progressed to now that they’ve won their freedom. We knew that this final episode would be more of an emotional departure than a really big action-filled episode.


Read More: Orphan Black Star Tatiana Maslany Talks Finale, Possible Sequel and What's Next



What was the inspiration behind the meta scene where Helena reads from her book, Orphan Black?

Manson: That was John’s idea originally, that Helena would be journaling this year. And then it became that the snake would sort of eat its tail and we would loop back and name the series and share a few gentle laughs with Clone Club about the name of Orphan Black, everybody saying what a dumb name it was. John and I heard that endlessly when we started this show. So it was a little gem that John wanted to take further; he really wanted Helena on a book tour.

Fawcett: I wanted her to get a publishing deal, but a publisher would only print it if they printed it as science fiction.

Manson: They’d never print it as a biography.

With all of the happy endings, why not bring back Helena’s love, Jesse (Patrick J. Adams)?

Manson: We love Patrick and we had so many things that we could have done with the finale and so many things that we wanted to see, but in the end it was important to focus on our girls and on them as a group and to not dilute that too much.

Fawcett: We always felt that Helena did not need a man, that she needed her sisters more. It was nice to give Helena that lovely little romance, but it’s a little too tidy to say he’s going to come back and they’re going off in the sunset to drive tow trucks together. It’s more important that Helena is embraced by her sisters and she’s going to raise her children with her extended family.

Manson: It was always important to us to feel like that character, after the journey she’s been on and where she ends, and as kooky and crazy as she’s been, that she’s going to be a great mother and those kids are in great hands because they’re with a mother who’s going to look after them.

Were those twins always going to be boys?

Manson: No. We left it wide open. We were trying to figure out what we liked the best. I don’t think we really decided it until halfway through the last season. There was something about knowing these boys are going to be brought up by this family of women that they will be progressive men. That they will be raised right, that they will respect women and that some of the evil patriarchal things that the show has worked so hard to expose, those things that we vilified, we can now feel safe about a new generation of men being raised by these women.

Fawcett: And then it was about what do we name them. Graeme just killed it by naming them Arthur and Donnie. That was a really moving moment, discovering that Helena named her two boys after those two men. I remember Kristian Brunn, he didn’t read the script until the table read. And when he read that he just started bawling. It was an incredibly moving moment when he realized that Helena had named one of her kids after him.


Read More: Orphan Black' Comic Book Series to Explore What Would Happen If Beth Lived (Exclusive)


Was there ever any genuine talk about killing one of the core four clones?

Manson: We pretty much knew that the main four would make it. Rachel was a different story and we debated long and hard about it. John was adamant that his girlfriend Rachel would have to survive and somehow be redeemed. We worked really hard at Rachel’s story and that was absolutely the right decision to keep her around too. It was a very interesting journey for that character and ultimately it says a lot about the sisterhood itself that Rachel redeems herself in this way. It’s not too saccharine. She’s not exactly accepted but she certainly redeemed herself.

Fawcett: Tonally, and it sounds silly, but we just wanted to have a happy ending. We wanted a hopeful, optimistic ending with our characters that we’ve spent so much time with. That was the driving emotional mood, was to end in a place of optimism.

How much did you want to push yourselves with that final group clone scene in the backyard?

Fawcett: That scene was incredibly important given fan expectation. That’s a big, difficult scene to get right. Every day on the set there was this pressure of expectation of what it was going to be. Those last scenes, the scenes in the backyard with the four of them and of course the clone birthing scene were probably the most emotional and most difficult to do just because it was the end. It was really the end of these characters that we love so much.

Manson: We were really pushing those scenes; they were long scenes. The birthing scene is a long scene. Maybe not as long on the page as it is on screen. And the scene at the end in Alison’s backyard, that was also a long scene. It was a high wire act for Tatiana and Jordan Gervais and for Kathryn Alexander particularly. And the rest of our doubles actually, because it’s a four-clone scene.

Fawcett: From a technical point of view, once you’ve done clone dance parties and clones birthing babies and big dinner table scenes, it’s actually fairly straightforward to just sit down four girls and have a conversation. It’s all about the performance at that point. Every day we were wrapping a new character. That backyard scene was the last time we saw Cosima. When we called cut, that was the end of Cosima, never to see her again. And it was sad. We had a whole whack of days like that.

At this point, how much serious talk of a spinoff or movie has there been?

Manson: Orphan Black began in 2001 as a feature film concept that John and I came up with and we could never contain this crazy universe in a single movie. Maybe now we can. Maybe now that we spat out a bunch of story on TV, maybe there is a concept that would support a feature. At the moment we’re resting, we’re going to let those characters rest a while. I have a feeling they’re going to come back to haunt us in the best way.

Fawcett: I believe that. For so many years this has been not just Graeme’s and my baby, but a lot of people's. It was a project born of passion and excitement and just awe. It’s dramatically changed everyone’s life and I really hope people will continue to discover the show and that it will find more audiences in the years to come.

Manson: We both have a lot of fate in Clone Club, in this family that’s grown up around the show. We just wish them the best and hope they make art and science and create their own families and continue to support each other and continue to celebrate the most important theme of the show, and that is that there is strength in diversity. Especially at this time, I hope it resonates and that people carry that residue forward.

Thoughts?
Twitter: @amber_dowling
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PostSubject: Re: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Sun Aug 13, 2017 3:52 pm



Great scene!
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PostSubject: Re: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Tue Aug 15, 2017 8:45 pm

tscc1000 wrote:
Wow ... the curtain has fallen ...
The ending was well done (if only Mrs. S would have survived too!).
But I really, really will miss this show and it's fine characters.
Watching those last 15 minutes of the series I had a lot of melancholy kicking in ...
I definitely would watch more of the clone club ... sadly all the good things have to end too ...
And there was no happy ending for Rachel ... I kind of fealt sad for her ...
Orphan Black was a truely unique show and it will always be worth a recommendation and another watch.

Yes I really liked everything about the finale. I am glad that the last half was dedicated to wrapping up the lives of the Seestras! Also, loved Helena's memoir being named Orphan Black, nice wink to the fans. Sad for Rachel as well, she helped to bring down the Neolutionists, would have been nice if she could have reconciled as well. Gonna really miss this show!
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PostSubject: Re: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Fri Aug 18, 2017 5:36 pm

I cant comment as I wont be able to see the last season for awhile ! Sad
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PostSubject: Re: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Fri Aug 18, 2017 5:38 pm

seems it got a happy ending.
@ ez what do you think of the new whiter theme??
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PostSubject: Re: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Fri Aug 18, 2017 5:41 pm

also @ tscc, you can put up the other banner under display- pictures and colors forum main logo.
I may have it at image.org will check later on.
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PostSubject: Re: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Sat Aug 19, 2017 2:50 pm

T5000 wrote:
seems it got a happy ending.
@ ez what do you think of the new whiter theme??

It's a lot brighter lol, I don't mind it.
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PostSubject: Re: Orphan Black S05E10 "To Right The Wrongs of Many" August 12, 2017 (Series Finale)   Wed Aug 23, 2017 6:01 am

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